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The Force That Through The Green Fuse Drives The Flower

Rating: 4.1
The force that through the green fuse drives the flower
Drives my green age; that blasts the roots of trees
Is my destroyer.
And I am dumb to tell the crooked rose
My youth is bent by the same wintry fever.

The force that drives the water through the rocks
Drives my red blood; that dries the mouthing streams
Turns mine to wax.
And I am dumb to mouth unto my veins
How at the mountain spring the same mouth sucks.
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COMMENTS
Dominic Windram 10 September 2019
A powerful, profoundly poignant poem that deals with the paradoxical forces of creativity and destruction inherent in nature and the human condition.
0 0 Reply
Faizaan 03 July 2018
Real men in the world
2 0 Reply
Tapan M. Saren 16 July 2017
I think 'the force' here is 'time' it's one of the finest poems in the English Literature.
3 2 Reply
Greg Bell 27 February 2017
What a magnificent poem, full of dark paradox. Each stanza has at least one apparent paradox, usually more: The hand that whirls the water in the pool Stirs the quicksand; that ropes the blowing wind Hauls my shroud sail. Whose hand? ! A human hand can whirl the water in the pool, but who can stir the quicksand? (Takes a bigger than human hand, I think, that turns to the root of being, to the Deity. That ropes the blowing wind, again, invoking the prime mover, though, for contrast/comparison a human hand can haul his shroud sail. (Again, though, on a metaphorical level, that invokes The Great Hand.) The opening is unforgettable, but here's another stanza that could destroy the mind of a literalist: The lips of time leech to the fountain head; Love drips and gathers, but the fallen blood Shall calm her sores. And I am dumb to tell a weather's wind How time has ticked a heaven round the stars. Wildly musical, this poem goes way beyond music to invoke meaning in sounds. Intellectually ambitious, it can tie your head in knots if you take it literally This poem goes way beyond religion to a profound sense of unity with all creation. And, yes, with death, or rather, beyond death.
6 2 Reply
Devin 29 January 2018
your the coolest edy yet
0 0 Reply
Brian Jani 26 April 2014
Awesome I like this poem, check mine out
2 2 Reply
Devion 29 January 2018
thanks it really helped me
0 0 Reply
Will Vogel 02 February 2012
yo i aint get nuttin from dis ish
2 13 Reply
Sylva Portoian 28 February 2010
'The root of my trees is my destroyer', Oh what a stanza to analyze genetically He blames his bad genes destroying me, As, he enjoyed drinking heavily.
6 6 Reply
Sylva Portoian 28 February 2010
'The root of my trees is my destroyer', Oh what a stanza to analyze genetically He blames his bad genes destroying me, As, he enjoyed drinking heavily.
1 8 Reply
Thomas Egnoto 27 December 2008
It's about time, and how its grip is inescapable. Very depressing.
1 0 Reply
Derek Baron 28 August 2007
I disagree Barry: You're half-right. The One-Ness of all things, but man isn't impotent to witness it. He IS it. He's impotent to COMMUNICATE it. He's witnessing it so strongly though that its nearly blinding. True: one of the greatest poems at least of the 20th century. Thomas is right up there with Pound and Eliot in my eyes.
5 0 Reply
Greg Bell 27 February 2017
Yes, Derek, nearly blinding. Better, though, than Eliot & Pound, who are (for me) more cerebral but communicate less on an emotional level.
0 0 Reply
Greg Bell 27 February 2017
Yes, Derek, nearly blinding! And better, methinks, than Eliot & Pound, who are more cerebral but don't communicate nearly so deep a level of feeling.
0 0 Reply

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