Daniel Brick

Gold Star - 72,156 Points (June 10,1947 / St. Paul MN)

Spontaneous Sonnet Spring 2015 - Poem by Daniel Brick

The poem written in haste
spreads evenly across the page.
How could this happen in a world
of trampled syntax, labored meanings,
abandoned eloquence? Because,
no longer afraid of a misstep, I
assembled two dozen words selected
for their immediate wonder, and
watched as they dropped into grooves
of the stiff paper, looking thoroughly
at home with each other, never to be
dispersed again into separate lives.
Theirs is a collective fate, with each
reader swelling the darkness with light.

Topic(s) of this poem: poetry, truth

Form: Sonnet


Poet's Notes about The Poem

This poem is a defense of poetry in an environment in which the use of language is often debased. Politics, advertising, entertainment, media hype - these and other things have dulled our sense of the wonderful gift that language is. It is time to renew our commitment to using language with respect and creativity.

Comments about Spontaneous Sonnet Spring 2015 by Daniel Brick

  • Mihaela Pirjol (4/13/2015 4:47:00 AM)


    Definitely, a good balance between the stream of consciousness and a self-observing critique is necessary. (Report) Reply

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  • Diane Hine (4/12/2015 7:18:00 AM)


    I like it - very original, and it's nice to know that my impression has added something to the consensus. (Report) Reply

  • Nika Mcguin (4/9/2015 5:21:00 AM)


    Wow! This poem is just filled with amazing imagery; and even more amazingly it personifies words. Which to me is an amazing thing, because in one way or another I've always felt that words are alive. How can they not be when they have so much power and carry so much meaning.

    I
    assembled two dozen words selected
    for their immediate wonder, and
    watched as they dropped into grooves
    of the stiff paper, looking thoroughly
    at home with each other, never to be
    dispersed again into separate lives.
    Theirs is a collective fate

    That has got to be my favorite part of the poem, because its where the words slowly start to come alive.

    Though there's something else that got my attention about this poem as well. When you wrote that you were no longer afraid of misstep. I can really relate to that, because that's pretty much how I am with my poems now. I very honestly write whatever I'm feeling that day. And it's very rare that I change much about it. Now I'm going off on a tangent, so I'll end this lol. Anyhow, my point is that this poem is amazing! It seems so rare that you write a poem of this length, but it is definitely as sweet as it is short.

    ~Nika
    (Report) Reply

  • Magdalena Biela (4/3/2015 1:05:00 PM)


    To caress the words should be a gesture each of us makes on a daily basis as if one caresses a child. We hurt the words with every modern step we take walking away from the past and into the future...Often I hear a hush-hush whisper coming from the books' pages: h...p.....and I am not sure what the words try to say? Is it help? Is it hope? Thank you, Knight of the Words! (Report) Reply

  • Valsa George (4/2/2015 10:44:00 PM)


    There is a soothing spontaneity here! Each word has easily and effortlessly fallen into the right groove and this poem has a remarkable splendour with no extra embellishments of language or any synthetic sheen! A 10 (Report) Reply

  • Kelly Kurt (4/2/2015 12:50:00 PM)


    I agree, Daniel. And you are doing so with eloquence. Thanks (Report) Reply

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Poem Submitted: Thursday, April 2, 2015



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