Edith Hamilton


Do you like this poet?
0 person liked.
0 person did not like.


Edith Hamilton (August 12, 1867 – May 31, 1963) was a German-American educator and author who was "recognized as the greatest woman Classicist". She was sixty-two years old when The Greek Way, her first book, was published in 1930. It was instantly successful, and is the earliest expression of her belief in "the calm lucidity of the Greek mind" and "that the great thinkers... more »

Click here to add this poet to your My Favorite Poets.


Quotations

more quotations »
  • ''The anthropologists are busy, indeed, and ready to transport us back into the savage forest where all human things ... have their beginnings; but the seed never explains the flower.''
    Edith Hamilton (1867-1963), U.S. classical scholar, translator. The Greek Way, ch. 1 (1930).
  • ''Mind and spirit together make up that which separates us from the rest of the animal world, that which enables a man to know the truth and that which enables him to die for the truth.''
    Edith Hamilton (1867-1963), U.S. classical scholar, translator. The Greek Way, ch. 1 (1930).
  • ''None but a poet can write a tragedy. For tragedy is nothing less than pain transmuted into exaltation by the alchemy of poetry.''
    Edith Hamilton (1867-1963), U.S. classical scholar, translator. The Greek Way, ch. 11 (1930).
  • ''A people's literature is the great textbook for real knowledge of them. The writings of the day show the quality of the people as no historical reconstruction can.''
    Edith Hamilton (1867-1963), U.S. classical scholar, translator. The Roman Way, preface (1932).
  • ''Theories that go counter to the facts of human nature are foredoomed.''
    Edith Hamilton (1867-1963), U.S. classical scholar, translator. The Roman Way, ch. 1 (1932).
Read more quotations »

Comments about Edith Hamilton

---
There is no comment submitted by members..
[Report Error]