Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

(27 February 1807 – 24 March 1882 / Portland, Maine)

Aftermath - Poem by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

When the summer fields are mown,
When the birds are fledged and flown,
And the dry leaves strew the path;
With the falling of the snow,
With the cawing of the crow,
Once again the fields we mow
And gather in the aftermath.
Not the sweet, new grass with flowers
Is this harvesting of ours;
Not the upland clover bloom;
But the rowen mixed with weeds,
Tangled tufts from marsh and meads,
Where the poppy drops its seeds
In the silence and the gloom.


Comments about Aftermath by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

  • Robert Murray Smith (2/27/2017 11:24:00 PM)


    An extremely eagle eye was needed for this poem. (Report) Reply

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  • Indira Renganathan (2/27/2017 11:08:00 PM)


    Wonderful way of description....excellent and too good (Report) Reply

  • (2/27/2017 10:38:00 PM)


    Marvelous depiction of transition from one season to another along with the changes in nature's manifestations and the lovely rhythm of the flowing have made this poem exceptionally beautiful. Thanks for sharing it here. (Report) Reply

  • Kim Barney (2/27/2017 7:01:00 PM)


    After math, I have English, then P.E., then history... (Report) Reply

  • Susan Williams (2/27/2017 4:22:00 PM)


    Wow! This is the pinnacle of loveliness. The rhythm and the rhymes set the readers' feet on the path in the changing seasons of this farmland. This is art from the Master's hand. (Report) Reply

  • (2/27/2017 1:39:00 PM)


    Aftermath settles my soul and breaks my heart at the same time. The autumn harvest comes with comfort as well as darkness, but come it must. (Report) Reply

  • Seema Devi Sharma (2/27/2017 10:50:00 AM)


    With the falling of the snow,
    With the cawing of the crow,
    Once again the fields we mow
    And gather in the aftermath.
    Not the sweet, new grass with flowers
    Is this harvesting of ours;
    Not the upland clover bloom;
    But the rowen mixed with weeds,
    Tangled tufts from marsh and meads,
    Where the poppy drops its seeds
    In the silence and the gloom.
    Loved and enjoyed this poem. Great.
    (Report) Reply

  • Tom Allport (2/27/2017 4:14:00 AM)


    a mowing poem with a poppy ending? brilliant! (Report) Reply

  • Edward Kofi Louis (2/27/2017 1:03:00 AM)


    Mixed with weeds! Thanks for sharing. (Report) Reply

  • (8/23/2015 8:35:00 PM)


    ...........wonderful imagery...very nicely done ★ (Report) Reply

  • (12/12/2012 3:43:00 PM)


    I love Longfellow he is by far my favorite poet :) (Report) Reply

  • (4/15/2008 9:31:00 PM)


    I think this is a beautiful poem! The word 'Aftermath, ' usually associated with tragic events, here has a second meeting-a second harvest that occurs when the fall harvest stirs the seeds around and causes new growth, weeks later, when winter is upon us. The rhyme scheme is pleasing, the images of tiny flowers among the underbrush are unexpected, and the message is that honest labor has its own rewards. (Report) Reply

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Read poems about / on: snow, silence, summer, flower



Poem Submitted: Thursday, January 1, 2004



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