Edward Lear

(12 May 1812 – 29 January 1888 / London / England)

Incidents In The Life Of My Uncle Arly

Poem by Edward Lear

O my aged Uncle Arly!
Sitting on a heap of Barley
Thro' the silent hours of night,
Close beside a leafy thicket:
On his nose there was a Cricket,
In his hat a Railway-ticket
(But his shoes were far too tight).

Long ago, in youth, he squander'd
All his goods away, and wander'd
To the Tinskoop-hills afar.
There on golden sunsets blazing,
Every evening found him gazing,
Singing, 'Orb! you're quite amazing!
How I wonder what you are!'

Like the ancient Medes and Persians,
Always by his own exertions
He subsisted on those hills;
Whiles, by teaching children spelling,
Or at times by merely yelling,
Or at intervals by selling
'Propter's Nicodemus Pills.'

Later, in his morning rambles
He perceived the moving brambles
Something square and white disclose;
'Twas a First-class Railway-Ticket;
But, on stooping down to pick it
Off the ground - a pea-green Cricket
Settled on my uncle's Nose.

Never - never more - oh, never,
Did that Cricket leave him ever,
Dawn or evening, day or night;
Clinging as a constant treasure,
Chirping with a cheerious measure,
Wholly to my uncle's pleasure
(Though his shoes were far too tight).

So for three and forty winters,
Till his shoes were worn to splinters,
All those hills he wander'd o'er,
Sometimes silent; sometimes yelling;
Till he came to Borley-Melling,
Near his old ancestral dwelling
(But his shoes were far too tight).

On a little heap of Barley
Died my aged Uncle Arly,
And they buried him one night;
Close beside the leafy thicket;
There - his hat and Railway-Ticket;
There - his ever-faithful Cricket
(But his shoes were far too tight).


Comments about Incidents In The Life Of My Uncle Arly by Edward Lear

  • Deepak Kumar Pattanayak (7/31/2020 10:24:00 PM)

    There are many incidents that come in one's life and one such incident that one is so engrossed with may carry him through to the last leaves lasting impact on others to remember with.....very touching and well crafted 10++(Report)Reply

    0 person liked.
    0 person did not like.
  • Michelle BenjaminMichelle Benjamin (7/31/2020 2:03:00 PM)

    great poem really love it Long ago, in youth, he squander'd
    All his goods away, and wander'd
    To the Tinskoop-hills afar.(Report)Reply

    0 person liked.
    0 person did not like.
  • Dr Tony BrahminDr Tony Brahmin (7/31/2020 11:40:00 AM)

    On a little heap of Barley
    Died my aged Uncle Arly,
    And they buried him one night;
    Close beside the leafy thicket
    very good poem(Report)Reply

    0 person liked.
    0 person did not like.
  • Edward Kofi LouisEdward Kofi Louis (7/31/2020 8:31:00 AM)

    Tight shoes! !
    Muse of your uncle,
    Very busy!
    Day and night.

    Thanks for sharing this poem with us.(Report)Reply

    0 person liked.
    0 person did not like.
  • Mahtab BangaleeMahtab Bangalee (7/31/2020 8:23:00 AM)

    Uncle Arly
    And the life
    Under the poetic description
    Excellently expressed(Report)Reply

    0 person liked.
    0 person did not like.
  • Shreya Hacks (7/31/2020 7:21:00 AM)

    Good storytelling. I like the way it is narrated.(Report)Reply

    0 person liked.
    0 person did not like.
  • Rajnish MangaRajnish Manga (7/31/2020 1:18:00 AM)

    Enjoyed the funny poem of Edward Lear. Here is my feedback:

    Once there was the aged Uncle Arly;
    Who was sitting on the heap of Barley;
    Fermenting to make some beer,
    For himself and also for Mr Lear,
    They got drunk and cursed Mr Charlie.(Report)Reply

    0 person liked.
    0 person did not like.
  • Juhaina TumluJuhaina Tumlu (7/31/2020 12:51:00 AM)

    A nice life story of Uncle Arly. Though death is ultimate.(Report)Reply

    0 person liked.
    0 person did not like.
  • Susan WilliamsSusan Williams (2/7/2016 3:17:00 PM)

    There were some interesting passages here but in the end I sat here wondering what it was all about(Report)Reply

    18 person liked.
    0 person did not like.
Read all 9 comments »



Read this poem in other languages

This poem has not been translated into any other language yet.

I would like to translate this poem »

word flags

What do you think this poem is about?



Poem Submitted: Wednesday, April 14, 2010