Michael Drayton

(1563 - 1631 / Warwickshire / England)

Sonnet Xlix: Thou Leaden Brain - Poem by Michael Drayton

Thou leaden brain, which censur'st what I write,
And say'st my lines be dull and do not move,
I marvel not thou feel'st not my delight,
Which never felt'st my fiery touch of love.
But thou, whose pen hath like a pack-horse serv'd,
Whose stomach unto gall hath turn'd thy food,
Whose senses, like poor prisoners, hunger-starv'd,
Whose grief hath parch'd thy body, dried thy blood,
Thou which hast scorned life and hated death,
And in a moment mad, sober, glad, and sorry,
Thou which hast bann'd thy thoughts and curs'd thy breath
With thousand plagues, more than in Purgatory,
Thou thus whose spirit Love in his fire refines,
Come thou, and read, admire, applaud my lines.


Comments about Sonnet Xlix: Thou Leaden Brain by Michael Drayton

  • Clinton Siegle (8/24/2018 6:32:00 PM)


    read and admire.. nice.. purgatory can you escape it? (Report) Reply

    0 person liked.
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  • Adrian Flett (8/24/2018 4:21:00 AM)


    A fine invitation to enjoy his sonnet (Report) Reply

  • Edward Kofi Louis (8/24/2017 10:13:00 PM)


    Applaud my lines! ! Thanks for sharing this poem with us. (Report) Reply

  • Kumarmani Mahakul (8/24/2017 7:50:00 PM)


    And in a moment mad, sober, glad, and sorry,
    Thou which hast bann'd thy thoughts and curs'd thy breath
    With thousand plagues, more than in Purgatory,
    Thou thus whose spirit Love in his fire refines,
    Come thou, and read, admire, applaud my lines... touching expression. It is a beautiful sonnet on life and death.
    (Report) Reply

  • Subhas Chandra Chakra (8/24/2017 9:40:00 AM)


    Whose stomach unto gall hath turn'd thy food,
    Whose senses, like poor prisoners, hunger-starv'd,
    Whose grief hath parch'd thy body, dried thy blood,
    Thou which hast scorned life and hated death,

    Beautiful lines by the poet.
    Thanks for the sharing, . It needs a synchronous head with a loving heart to go ahead.
    (Report) Reply

  • Lantz Pierre (8/24/2017 4:02:00 AM)


    Exquisitely executed sonnet. The author talking to, reproaching actually, his own intellect as it dissects and lays bare his failures. Hewing to logic the intellect's critical facility pulls at loose threads and unravels what otherwise might have merit, were it to be observed more roundly, more wholly towards its larger purpose. What a difficult task-master to serve. But it is in truth in service of the author as a whole. The intellect is but one compartmentalized aspect the author draws on to reinforce and strengthen the work. A tool, nothing more, but a vital tool and necessary to complete the task. In no way superfluous or superficial to the completed goal. So the author shifts from being reproached to reminding intellect that it does not hold sway over all and must, in the end, submit and admit totality, even from the perspective of intellect, is beautiful and giving of pleasures beyond the confines of logic. Quite a thoughtful meditation. (Report) Reply

  • Rajnish Manga (8/24/2017 1:01:00 AM)


    Thou leaden brain....
    Which never felt'st my fiery touch of love.
    Come thou, and read, admire, applaud my lines.... // The brain and the heart should remain in complete harmony to enrich life. Thanks.
    (Report) Reply

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Read poems about / on: sorry, horse, food, grief, fire, death, love, life, sonnet, hate



Poem Submitted: Friday, January 3, 2003



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