Mewlana Jalaluddin Rumi

Mewlana Jalaluddin Rumi Poems

A moment of happiness,
you and I sitting on the verandah,
apparently two, but one in soul, you and I.
...

Because I cannot sleep
I make music at night.
I am troubled by the one
...

Be with those who help your being.
Don't sit with indifferent people, whose breath
comes cold out of their mouths.
...

Birdsong brings relief
to my longing
I'm just as ecstatic as they are,
but with nothing to say!
...

Any soul that drank the nectar of your passion was lifted.
From that water of life he is in a state of elation.
...

A stone I died and rose again a plant;
A plant I died and rose an animal;
I died an animal and was born a man.
...

Every day I bear a burden, and I bear this calamity for a purpose:
I bear the discomfort of cold and December's snow in hope of spring.
Before the fattener-up of all who are lean, I drag this so emaciated body;
Though they expel me from two hundred cities, I bear it for the sake of the love of a prince;
...

All through eternity
Beauty unveils His exquisite form
in the solitude of nothingness;
...
...

At the twilight, a moon appeared in the sky;
Then it landed on earth to look at me.
...

Any lifetime that is spent without seeing the master
Is either death in disguise or a deep sleep.
The water that pollutes you is poison;
...

Did I not say to you, “Go not there, for I am your friend; in this
mirage of annihilation I am the fountain of life? ”
Even though in anger you depart a hundred thousand years
from me, in the end you will come to me, for I am your goal.
...

Wonderer, worshipper, lover of leaving.
It doesn't matter.
Ours is not a caravan of despair.
...

Lord, said David, since you do not need us,
why did you create these two worlds?
...

218

I have a fire for you in my mouth, but I have a hundred seals
on my tongue.
...

This being human is a guest house.
Every morning a new arrival.
...

216

Bring wine, for I am suffering crop sickness from the vintage;
God has seized me, and I am thus held fast.
...

I closed my eyes to creation when I beheld his beauty, I became
intoxicated with his beauty and bestowed my soul.
For the sake of Solomon’s seal I became wax in all my body,
and in order to become illumined I rubbed my wax.
...

A lover asked his beloved,
Do you love yourself more
...

A true lover is proved such by his pain of heart;
No sickness is there like sickness of heart.
The lover's ailment is different from all ailments;
...

Rise, lovers, that we may go towards heaven; we have seen this world, so let us go to that world.
No, no, for thought these two gardens are beautiful and fair, let us pass beyond these two, and go to that Gardener.
Let us go prostrating to the sea like a torrent, then let us go foaming upon the face of the sea.
Let us journey from this street of mourning to the wedding feast, let us go from this saffron face to the face of the Judas tree blossom.
...

Mewlana Jalaluddin Rumi Biography

Jalāl ad-Dīn Muhammad Balkhī (Persian: جلال‌الدین محمد بلخى‎), also known as Jalāl ad-Dīn Muhammad Rūmī (جلال‌الدین محمد رومی), and more popularly in the English-speaking world simply as Rumi (30 September 1207 – 17 December 1273), was a 13th-century Persian[1][6] poet, jurist, theologian, and Sufi mystic.[7] Iranians, Turks, Afghans, Tajiks, and other Central Asian Muslims as well as the Muslims of South Asia have greatly appreciated his spiritual legacy in the past seven centuries.[8] Rumi's importance is considered to transcend national and ethnic borders. His poems have been widely translated into many of the world's languages and transposed into various formats. In 2007, he was described as the "most popular poet in America."[9] Rumi's works are written in Persian and his Mathnawi remains one of the purest literary glories of Persia,[10] and one of the crowning glories of the Persian language.[11] His original works are widely read today in their original language across the Persian-speaking world (Iran, Tajikistan, Afghanistan and parts of Persian speaking Central Asia).[12] Translations of his works are very popular in other countries. His poetry has influenced Persian literature as well as Urdu, Punjabi, Turkish and some other Iranian, Turkic and Indic languages written in Perso-Arabic script e.g. Pashto, Ottoman Turkish, Chagatai and Sindhi. Name Jalāl ad-Dīn Muḥammad Balkhī (Persian: جلال‌الدین محمد بلخى‎ Persian pronunciation: [dʒælɒːlæddiːn mohæmmæde bælxiː]) is also known as Jalāl ad-Dīn Muḥammad Rūmī (جلال‌الدین محمد رومی Persian pronunciation: [dʒælɒːlæddiːn mohæmmæde ɾuːmiː]). He is widely known by the sobriquet Mawlānā/Molānā[1][4] (Persian: مولانا‎ Persian pronunciation: [moulɒːnɒː]) in Iran and Afghanistan, and popularly known as Mevlâna in Turkey. According to the authoritative Rumi biographer Franklin Lewis of the University of Chicago, "[t]he Anatolian peninsula which had belonged to the Byzantine, or eastern Roman empire, had only relatively recently been conquered by Muslims and even when it came to be controlled by Turkish Muslim rulers, it was still known to Arabs, Persians and Turks as the geographical area of Rum. As such, there are a number of historical personages born in or associated with Anatolia known as Rumi, a word borrowed from Arabic literally meaning “Roman,” in which context Roman refers to subjects of the Byzantine Empire or simply to people living in or things associated with Anatolia. In Muslim countries, therefore, Jalal al-Din is not generally known as "Rumi"."[13] The terms مولوی Mawlavi (Persian) and Mevlevi (Turkish) which mean "having to do with the master" are more often used for him.[14] Rumi was born to native Persian speaking parents,[15][16][17] probably in the village of Wakhsh,[3] a small town located at the river Wakhsh in Persia (in what is now Tajikistan). Wakhsh belonged to the larger province of Balkh (parts of now modern Afghanistan and Tajikistan), and in the year Rumi was born, his father was an appointed scholar there.[3] Greater Balkh was at that time a major center of a Persian culture[11][17][18] and Khorasani Sufism had developed there for several centuries. Indeed, the most important influences upon Rumi, besides his father, are said to be the Persian poets Attar and Sanai.[19] Rumi in one poem express his appreciation: "Attar was the spirit, Sanai his eyes twain, And in time thereafter, Came we in their train"[20] and mentions in another poem: "Attar has traversed the seven cities of Love, We are still at the turn of one street".[21] His father was also connected to the spiritual lineage of Najm al-Din Kubra.[8] He lived most of his life under the Persianate[22][23][24] Seljuq Sultanate of Rum, where he produced his works [25] and died in 1273 AD. He was buried in Konya and his shrine became a place of pilgrimage.[26] Following his death, his followers and his son Sultan Walad founded the Mevlevi Order, also known as the Order of the Whirling Dervishes, famous for its Sufi dance known as the Sama ceremony. He was laid to rest beside his father, and over his remains a splendid shrine was erected. A hagiographical account of him is described in Shams ud-Din Ahmad Aflāki's Manāqib ul-Ārifīn (written between 1318 and 1353). This hagiographical account of his biography needs to be treated with care as it contains both legends and facts about Rumi.[27] For example, Professor Franklin Lewis, Chicago University, in the most complete biography on Rumi has a separate section for the hagiographical biography on Rumi and actual biography about him.[28] Rumi's father was Bahā ud-Dīn Walad, a theologian, jurist and a mystic from Wakhsh, who was also known by the followers of Rumi as Sultan al-Ulama or "Sultan of the Scholars". The popular hagiographer assertions that have claimed the family's descent from the Caliph Abu Bakr does not hold on closer examination and is rejected by modern scholars.[28][29][30] The claim of maternal descent from the Khwarazmshah for Rumi or his father is also seen as a non-historical hagiographical tradition designed to connect the family with royalty, but this claim is rejected for chronological and historical reasons.[28][29][30] The most complete genealogy offered for the family stretches back to six or seven generations to famous Hanafi Jurists.[28][29][30] We do not learn the name of Baha al-Din's mother in the sources, but only that he referred to her as "Māmi" (Colloquial Persian for Māma)[31] and that she was a simple woman and that she lives in 13th century. The mother of Rumi was Mu'mina Khātūn. The profession of the family for several generations was that of Islamic preachers of the liberal Hanafi rite and this family tradition was continued by Rumi (see his Fihi Ma Fih and Seven Sermons) and Sultan Walad (see Ma'rif Waladi for examples of his everyday sermons and lectures). When the Mongols invaded Central Asia sometime between 1215 and 1220, Baha ud-Din Walad, with his whole family and a group of disciples, set out westwards. According to hagiographical account which is not agreed upon by all Rumi scholars, Rumi encountered one of the most famous mystic Persian poets, Attar, in the Iranian city of Nishapur, located in the province of Khorāsān. Attar immediately recognized Rumi's spiritual eminence. He saw the father walking ahead of the son and said, "Here comes a sea followed by an ocean."[this quote needs a citation] He gave the boy his Asrārnāma, a book about the entanglement of the soul in the material world. This meeting had a deep impact on the eighteen-year-old Rumi and later on became the inspiration for his works. From Nishapur, Walad and his entourage set out for Baghdad, meeting many of the scholars and Sufis of the city.[32] From Baghdad they went to Hejaz and performed the pilgrimage at Mecca. The migrating caravan then passed through Damascus, Malatya, Erzincan, Sivas, Kayseri and Nigde. They finally settled in Karaman for seven years; Rumi's mother and brother both died there. In 1225, Rumi married Gowhar Khatun in Karaman. They had two sons: Sultan Walad and Ala-eddin Chalabi. When his wife died, Rumi married again and had a son, Amir Alim Chalabi, and a daughter, Malakeh Khatun. On 1 May 1228, most likely as a result of the insistent invitation of 'Alā' ud-Dīn Key-Qobād, ruler of Anatolia, Baha' ud-Din came and finally settled in Konya in Anatolia within the westernmost territories of the Seljuk Sultanate of Rûm. Baha' ud-Din became the head of a madrassa (religious school) and when he died, Rumi, aged twenty-five, inherited his position as the Islamic molvi. One of Baha' ud-Din's students, Sayyed Burhan ud-Din Muhaqqiq Termazi, continued to train Rumi in the Shariah as well as the Tariqa, especially that of Rumi's father. For nine years, Rumi practiced Sufism as a disciple of Burhan ud-Din until the latter died in 1240 or 1241. Rumi's public life then began: he became an Islamic Jurist, issuing fatwas and giving sermons in the mosques of Konya. He also served as a Molvi (Islamic teacher) and taught his adherents in the madrassa. During this period, Rumi also traveled to Damascus and is said to have spent four years there. It was his meeting with the dervish Shams-e Tabrizi on 15 November 1244 that completely changed his life. From an accomplished teacher and jurist, Rumi was transformed into an ascetic. Shams had traveled throughout the Middle East searching and praying for someone who could "endure my company". A voice said to him, "What will you give in return?" Shams replied, "My head!" The voice then said, "The one you seek is Jalal ud-Din of Konya." On the night of 5 December 1248, as Rumi and Shams were talking, Shams was called to the back door. He went out, never to be seen again. It is rumored that Shams was murdered with the connivance of Rumi's son, 'Ala' ud-Din; if so, Shams indeed gave his head for the privilege of mystical friendship.[33] Rumi's love for, and his bereavement at the death of, Shams found their expression in an outpouring lyric poems, Divan-e Shams-e Tabrizi. He himself went out searching for Shams and journeyed again to Damascus. There, he realized: Why should I seek? I am the same as He. His essence speaks through me. I have been looking for myself![34] Mewlana had been spontaneously composing ghazals (Persian poems), and these had been collected in the Divan-i Kabir or Diwan Shams Tabrizi. Rumi found another companion in Salaḥ ud-Din-e Zarkub, a goldsmith. After Salah ud-Din's death, Rumi's scribe and favorite student, Hussam-e Chalabi, assumed the role of Rumi's companion. One day, the two of them were wandering through the Meram vineyards outside Konya when Hussam described to Rumi an idea he had had: "If you were to write a book like the Ilāhīnāma of Sanai or the Mantiq ut-Tayr of 'Attar, it would become the companion of many troubadours. They would fill their hearts from your work and compose music to accompany it." Rumi smiled and took out a piece of paper on which were written the opening eighteen lines of his Masnavi, beginning with: Listen to the reed and the tale it tells, How it sings of separation...[35] Hussam implored Rumi to write more. Rumi spent the next twelve years of his life in Anatolia dictating the six volumes of this masterwork, the Masnavi, to Hussam. In December 1273, Rumi fell ill; he predicted his own death and composed the well-known ghazal, which begins with the verse: How doest thou know what sort of king I have within me as companion? Do not cast thy glance upon my golden face, for I have iron legs.[36] Rumi died on 17 December 1273 in Konya; his body was interred beside that of his father, and a splendid shrine, the Yeşil Türbe (Green Tomb, قبه الخضراء; today the Mevlâna Museum), was erected over his place of burial. His epitaph reads: When we are dead, seek not our tomb in the earth, but find it in the hearts of men.[37] The 13th century Mevlâna Mausoleum, with its mosque, dance hall, dervish living quarters, school and tombs of some leaders of the Mevlevi Order, continues to this day to draw pilgrims from all parts of the Muslim and non-Muslim world. Jalal al-Din who is also known as Rumi, was a philosopher and mystic of Islam. His doctrine advocates unlimited tolerance, positive reasoning, goodness, charity and awareness through love. To him and to his disciples all religions are more or less truth. Looking with the same eye on Muslim, Jew and Christian alike, his peaceful and tolerant teaching has appealed to people of all sects and creeds. However, despite the aforementioned ecumenical attitude, and contrary to his contemporary portrayal in the West as a proponent of non-denominational spirituality, a number of Rumi poems suggest the importance of outward religious observance, the primacy of the Qur'an.[58] Flee to God's Qur'an, take refuge in it there with the spirits of the prophets merge. The Book conveys the prophets' circumstances those fish of the pure sea of Majesty.[59] Seyyed Hossein Nasr states: One of the greatest living authorities on Rûmî in Persia today, Hâdî Hâ'irî, has shown in an unpublished work that some 6,000 verses of the Dîwân and the Mathnawî are practically direct translations of Qur'ânic verses into Persian poetry.[60] Rumi states in his Dīwān: The Sufi is hanging on to Muhammad, like Abu Bakr.[61] His Masnavi contains anecdotes and stories derived largely from the Quran and the hadith, as well as everyday tales. On the first page of the Masnavi, Rumi states: "Hadha kitâbu 'l- mathnawîy wa huwa uSûlu uSûli uSûli 'd-dîn wa kashshâfu 'l-qur'ân." This is the book of the Masnavi, and it is the roots of the roots of the roots of the (Islamic) Religion and it is the Explainer of the Qur'ân.[this quote needs a citation] The famous (15th century) Sufi poet Jâmî, said of the Masnavi,[62] "Hast qur'ân dar zabân-é pahlawî" It is the Qur'ân in the Persian tongue.)

The Best Poem Of Mewlana Jalaluddin Rumi

A Moment Of Happiness

A moment of happiness,
you and I sitting on the verandah,
apparently two, but one in soul, you and I.
We feel the flowing water of life here,
you and I, with the garden's beauty
and the birds singing.
The stars will be watching us,
and we will show them
what it is to be a thin crescent moon.
You and I unselfed, will be together,
indifferent to idle speculation, you and I.
The parrots of heaven will be cracking sugar
as we laugh together, you and I.
In one form upon this earth,
and in another form in a timeless sweet land.

Mewlana Jalaluddin Rumi Comments

Debasish Mridha, M. D. 05 January 2013

Rumi is one of the greatest mystic poet with deeper perception and appreciation of truth and the universe as a whole.

161 25 Reply
Fabrizio Frosini 02 March 2016

In December 1273, when Rumi fell ill, he predicted his own death and composed a ghazal which begins with the verse: '' How doest thou know what sort of king I have within me as companion? Do not cast thy glance upon my golden face, for I have iron legs. ''

153 1 Reply
Sayeed Abubakar 23 May 2012

My most favourite poet of the world.

112 31 Reply
Wahab Abdul 26 October 2013

he was chosen as the most favourite poet of USA in 2007....so as to me

77 18 Reply
Fatima Nayimi 02 October 2014

His poems are not only beautiful but inspirational. He makes me proud to be an Afghan. [3

45 10 Reply
Sylvia Frances Chan 05 January 2022

WOW-WOW-WOW- The Great Rumi is today The Poet Of The Day, hoorray! CONGRSATULATIONS to his close relatives

0 0 Reply
Jule Hanlon 15 October 2021

no poet holds my heart like Rumi...

0 0 Reply
Sylvia Frances Chan 27 July 2021

So very happy to read that The Great Philosopher and thinker has been chosen as The Poet Of The Day. Hoorray!

0 0 Reply
Christopher Daley 01 December 2020

Please help me to find the Rumi poem where he says something like: " Just because the blanket has a run/slipped thread (or a tear) I would not throw it away..." Thank you.

1 0 Reply
Pat Sherwin 17 August 2020

I cannot find Rumi's poem " Enlightenment is a gamble" ? ?

0 0 Reply

Mewlana Jalaluddin Rumi Quotes

“Your task is not to seek for love, but merely to seek and find all the barriers within yourself that you have built against it.”

“The wound is the place where the Light enters you.”

“Stop acting so small. You are the universe in ecstatic motion.”

“What you seek is seeking you.”

“Don’t grieve. Anything you lose comes round in another form.”

“Dance, when youre broken open. Dance, if youve torn the bandage off. Dance in the middle of the fighting. Dance in your blood. Dance when youre perfectly free.”

“If you are irritated by every rub, how will your mirror be polished?”

“You were born with wings, why prefer to crawl through life?”

“Forget safety. Live where you fear to live. Destroy your reputation. Be notorious.”

“When you do things from your soul, you feel a river moving in you, a joy.”

“Dont be satisfied with stories, how things have gone with others. Unfold your own myth.”

“Yesterday I was clever, so I wanted to change the world. Today I am wise, so I am changing myself.”

“My soul is from elsewhere, Im sure of that, and I intend to end up there.”

“Sell your cleverness and buy bewilderment.”

“silence is the language of god, all else is poor translation.”

“Ignore those that make you fearful and sad, that degrade you back towards disease and death.”

“Raise your words, not voice. It is rain that grows flowers, not thunder.”

“In your light I learn how to love. In your beauty, how to make poems. You dance inside my chest where no-one sees you, but sometimes I do, and that sight becomes this art.”

“Lovers dont finally meet somewhere. Theyre in each other all along.”

“Everything in the universe is within you. Ask all from yourself.”

“Where there is ruin, there is hope for a treasure.”

“I want to sing like the birds sing, not worrying about who hears or what they think.”

“Let yourself be drawn by the stronger pull of that which you truly love.”

“Be grateful for whoever comes, because each has been sent as a guide from beyond.”

“There is a candle in your heart, ready to be kindled. There is a void in your soul, ready to be filled. You feel it, dont you?”

“Words are a pretext. It is the inner bond that draws one person to another, not words.”

“Travel brings power and love back into your life.”

“Let the beauty we love be what we do. There are hundreds of ways to kneel and kiss the ground.”

“Set your life on fire. Seek those who fan your flames”

“Goodbyes are only for those who love with their eyes. Because for those who love with heart and soul there is no such thing as separation.”

“Be like the sun for grace and mercy. Be like the night to cover others faults. Be like running water for generosity. Be like death for rage and anger. Be like the Earth for modesty. Appear as you are. Be as you appear.”

“This is love: to fly toward a secret sky, to cause a hundred veils to fall each moment. First to let go of life. Finally, to take a step without feet.”

“A thousand half-loves must be forsaken to take one whole heart home.”

“We come spinning out of nothingness, scattering stars like dust.”

“Suffering is a gift. In it is hidden mercy.”

“Two there are who are never satisfied -- the lover of the world and the lover of knowledge.”

“I know youre tired but come, this is the way.”

“Either give me more wine or leave me alone.”

“I have lived on the lip of insanity, wanting to know reasons, knocking on a door. It opens. Ive been knocking from the inside.”

“Come, come, whoever you are. Wanderer, worshiper, lover of leaving. It doesnt matter. Ours is not a caravan of despair. come, even if you have broken your vows a thousand times. Come, yet again , come , come.”

“Be melting snow. Wash yourself of yourself.”

“Wherever you are, and whatever you do, be in love.”

“Take someone who doesnt keep score, whos not looking to be richer, or afraid of losing, who has not the slightest interest even in his own personality: hes free.”

“And you? When will you begin that long journey into yourself?”

“Start a huge, foolish project, like Noah…it makes absolutely no difference what people think of you.”

“Respond to every call that excites your spirit.”

“But listen to me. For one moment quit being sad. Hear blessings dropping their blossoms around you.”

“Reason is powerless in the expression of Love.”

“A mountain keeps an echo deep inside. Thats how I hold your voice.”

“That which God said to the rose, and caused it to laugh in full-blown beauty, He said to my heart, and made it a hundred times more beautiful.”

Mewlana Jalaluddin Rumi Popularity

Mewlana Jalaluddin Rumi Popularity

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