gershon hepner

Rookie - 10 Points (5 3 38 / leipzig)

Daughters Of Man - Poem by gershon hepner

Angelic beings lusted for the daughters
of man, who were the early generation
that lived before the Flood, when God sent waters
to earth. The angels caused miscegenation,
and formed new species God had not decided
to fashion when He first created Man,
whom angels scornfully had once derided
before their strange relationship began.

It started when they saw the daughters walking
around their gardens, sitting by the pool,
exposing their soft bodies, always talking
about the men whom they considered cool.
(By our own standards they were really not:
it’s hard to tell what they found so enthralling
about these men whom they considered hot,
when shamelessly they went Neanderthaling.)

The angels found these lovely girls entrancing––
in heaven females never looked like this!
God always seemed to disapprove of dancing,
and frowned whenever seeing angels kiss.
The angels’ hearts burned hot with lust when daughters
first left the pool to freshen up in showers,
then took their lovers to their private quarters,
in mansions architects and their contractors
had built for nouveaux riches who favored specs
deplored by many puritan detractors
and disparagers of chambers made for sex.

Regrettably some angels who’d descended
and taken daughters to their beds with passion,
performed in ways that God had not intended
for them to do in their angelic fashion.
Some hoped to intermarry, with the best
intentions that seducers often claim
to have when lusting, but it’s clear the rest
just wished to fool around, their only aim
fulfillment of the urges they discovered
they shared with daughters of mankind, while free
of angel inhibitions while they hovered
and flapped their wings in their seraphic spree.

In consequence of this strange misalliance
occurring when an angel swived a daughter,
there rose a race of legendary giants––
though many offspring were a good deal shorter,
and may still hang around in places
where angels, you might think, would fear to tread.
You may not tell this when you see their faces,
but recognize it when they’re in your bed,
because their genes survive in Casanovas,
who till this day devote themselves to flouting
the sex laws in the Bible of Jehovah’s
Old Testament, its jurisdiction doubting.

The sight of angels courting made God ill. Joy
was part of His original great plan,
supporting fun between a girl and boy
but not with angels fooling round with Man.
Disgusted both with angels and mankind,
He cut Man’s years to just one hundred twenty,
though if you read the Psalmist you will find
that eighty years are often more than plenty,
and seventy for many is enough,
the extra ten a bonus Medicare
would rather you’d forego, because it’s tough
to fund grandparents, even as their heir.

The moral of this story is uncertain,
but I believe the Bible tries to tell us
we shouldn’t gaze behind the shower curtain
if people there are not familiar fellahs,
for even angels’ feet are often made
of clay, and humans’ feet are even weaker,
and daughters who undress may be dismayed
by visits from an unexpected peeker.



2/25/04,6/5/06,5/19/07


Comments about Daughters Of Man by gershon hepner

  • (1/20/2008 11:13:00 PM)


    I am bent over laughing! Thank you. (Report) Reply

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Poem Submitted: Tuesday, June 6, 2006

Poem Edited: Tuesday, May 29, 2007


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