John Milton

(9 December 1608 – 8 November 1674 / London, England)

On His Blindness - Poem by John Milton

When I consider how my light is spent
Ere half my days in this dark world and wide,
And that one talent which is death to hide
Lodg'd with me useless, though my soul more bent
To serve therewith my Maker, and present
My true account, lest he returning chide,
"Doth God exact day-labour, light denied?"
I fondly ask. But Patience, to prevent
That murmur, soon replies: "God doth not need
Either man's work or his own gifts: who best
Bear his mild yoke, they serve him best. His state
Is kingly; thousands at his bidding speed
And post o'er land and ocean without rest:
They also serve who only stand and wait."


Comments about On His Blindness by John Milton

  • (4/6/2018 12:11:00 AM)


    More objective question (Report) Reply

    0 person liked.
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  • (2/15/2018 12:36:00 AM)


    Thank you for your great contribution that you revealed through this poem on his blindness by John milton. From which I can read and know your sharing service. We know that our wisdom, knowledge, and skills are for the service of the society. Thus we fulfill our joy. (Report) Reply

  • (1/7/2018 11:11:00 PM)


    i love you sabado pati na rin linggo (Report) Reply

  • (1/7/2018 11:10:00 PM)


    i love you too and i miss you too forever and ever amen. (Report) Reply

  • (11/22/2017 11:48:00 PM)


    I liked the comment of Sri Harish Kumar quoting the words of the great astrophysicist Chandrasekhar. God does not need the service of man, as Milton has rightly pointed out and yet is important that we serve him selflessly so as to contribute to His scheme of things. A great poem indeed which I remember to have read in school. (Report) Reply

  • (11/21/2017 3:52:00 AM)


    Thanks for uploaded it (Report) Reply

  • (11/21/2017 12:40:00 AM)


    Y good poem (Report) Reply

  • (11/21/2017 12:37:00 AM)


    Wr8 areeeba its a very serious poem (Report) Reply

  • (11/21/2017 12:36:00 AM)


    Awesome poem (Report) Reply

  • (4/11/2017 11:17:00 AM)


    Milton who became blind after completing the 12 books of Paradise Lost thought that God had punished him for highlighting the project of Satan, the devil. To find relief, he wrote 2 more books of Paradise Regained. (Report) Reply

  • (3/12/2017 8:37:00 AM)


    Brilliant (Report) Reply

  • Tom Allport (1/9/2017 12:26:00 PM)

    tom allport
    Milton's poetic patience is just as relevant to day. (Report) Reply

  • Prabir Gayen (7/8/2016 4:35:00 PM)


    Tiuching (Report) Reply

  • (4/26/2016 5:26:00 AM)


    So cool a poem (Report) Reply

  • (4/26/2016 5:26:00 AM)


    So cool a poem (Report) Reply

  • Joshua Daniel (9/9/2015 3:25:00 AM)


    please read the last few lines of the poem and then you can understand the judgment given by lord sumner regarding common intention. (Report) Reply

  • Joshua Daniel (9/9/2015 3:24:00 AM)


    This poem was cited in reference to a case proving common intention section 34 of Indian Penal Code. (Report) Reply

  • Joshua Daniel (9/9/2015 3:23:00 AM)


    Achuthan Pillai cited this poem for judgment of Common Intention u/s section 34 of Indian Penal Code. To prove that the people who stand and wait also be regarded as perpetrators of the same offence. (Report) Reply

  • Aftab Alam Khursheed (2/25/2015 1:32:00 AM)


    Metaphor in John Milton and his suffering beautified the poems (Report) Reply

  • (6/18/2014 4:12:00 PM)


    ................a wonderful poem...truly a thought provoking write.... (Report) Reply

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Read poems about / on: ocean, work, light, dark, god, death, world



Poem Submitted: Friday, January 3, 2003



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