George Moses Horton

(1797 - 1884 / Northampton, North Carolina)

Departing Summer - Poem by George Moses Horton

When auburn Autumn mounts the stage,
And Summer fails her charms to yield,
Bleak nature turns another page,
To light the glories of the field.

At once the vale declines to bloom,
The forest smiles no longer gay;
Gardens are left without perfume,
The rose and lilly pine away.

The orchard bows her fruitless head,
As one divested of her store;
Or like a queen whose train has fled,
And left her sad to smile no more.

That bird which breath'd her vernal song,
And hopp'd along the flow'ry spray,
Now silent holds her warbling tongue,
Which dulcifies the feast of May.

But let each bitter have its sweet,
No change of nature is in vain;
'Tis just alternate cold and heat,
For time is pleasure mix'd with pain.


Comments about Departing Summer by George Moses Horton

  • Jayatissa K. Liyanage (12/10/2015 11:22:00 PM)


    Pretty much the same theme as that of my poem - Ending for a Beginning. Paraphrasing nature's events beautifully, weaving in to a wonderful rhythm. No change of nature is in vain; most certainly yes. Thank you George, for the wonderful poem. (Report) Reply

    1 person liked.
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  • Terry Craddock (12/10/2015 9:06:00 PM)


    'When auburn Autumn mounts the stage,
    And Summer fails her charms to yield,
    Bleak nature turns another page,
    To light the glories of the field.

    At once the vale declines to bloom,
    The forest smiles no longer gay;
    Gardens are left without perfume,
    The rose and lilly pine away.'

    especially enjoyed the first two stanzas, will have to return to this poet to appreciate more :)
    (Report) Reply

  • (12/10/2015 4:07:00 PM)


    Time is pleasure mix'd with pain. Life as seen with the lenses of seasons. Beautiful (Report) Reply

  • Susan Williams (12/10/2015 1:16:00 PM)


    I like the poem's last stanza: But let each bitter have its sweet,
    No change of nature is in vain;
    'Tis just alternate cold and heat,
    For time is pleasure mix'd with pain.
    (Report) Reply

  • Clarence Prince (12/10/2015 9:59:00 AM)


    For time is pleasure mix'd with pain' That's so true!
    What a poem and what a man!
    May he rest in peace!
    (Report) Reply

  • Ahmed Gumaa Siddiek (12/10/2015 9:59:00 AM)


    It is a nice poem with strong beginning using the personification device, showing autumn mounting the stage displacing the summer, with its charms and the decline of vales, that no will longer bloom. The summary of the whole situation comes at the last stanza, to teach the wisdom of “change” from cold to heat, and from pleasure to pain to show that happiness and sadness are two alternate human features and they are both normal life situations. (Report) Reply

  • Mohammed Asim Nehal (12/10/2015 7:51:00 AM)


    Nice poem with great imagery...
    That bird which breath'd her vernal song,
    And hopp'd along the flow'ry spray,
    Now silent holds her warbling tongue,
    Which dulcifies the feast of May.
    (Report) Reply

  • (12/10/2015 6:33:00 AM)


    But let each bitter have its sweet
    No change of nature is in vain
    It is just alternate cold and heat
    For time is pleasure mixed with pain.
    With excellent narration of effects of summer on flora and fauna, the poet has casually revealed the secret of life. Enjoyed the rhyme and beauty of the poem. Thanks for shaaring.
    (Report) Reply

  • Edward Kofi Louis (12/10/2015 2:47:00 AM)


    Gardens are left without perfume. Nice work. Thanks for sharing this poem with us. (Report) Reply

  • David Wood (12/10/2015 1:52:00 AM)


    A really delightful poem to wake up to. A worthy 10 (Report) Reply

Read all 10 comments »



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Poem Submitted: Saturday, April 10, 2010



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