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The Brook

Rating: 3.6

I come from haunts of coot and hern,
I make a sudden sally
And sparkle out among the fern,
To bicker down a valley.

By thirty hills I hurry down,
Or slip between the ridges,
By twenty thorpes, a little town,
And half a hundred bridges.

Till last by Philip's farm I flow
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COMMENTS OF THE POEM
Nick Homick 05 June 2013

This poem (clearly a transcendentalist homage to scriptural reference [Ecclesiastes 1: 4]) really is alive because rather than the static (earth) , it refers to the dynamic (water) - the brook yet endures - but in contrast, One never steps in the same river twice... (Heraclitus) . It is the dynamic flow, the journey of the brook, and the merging into everything it encounters, that appeals. Indeed the human being is the brook, for what else babbles and chatters at every turn, bickers and visits so many towns, to murmur and croon to the moon (wether or not anyone is listening) . Humanity is not a part of nature, we are nature - if absolutely true to it. Often people describe human nature as aberrant (war, sin, vice, etc...) - which is propaganda of the oppressor. I very strongly believe that Tennyson and I could be in agreement that nature IS true humanity - propaganda of the partner. The natural inclination of humanity to the Transcendentalists is reverence to nature in a divine sense. Our essence is goodness and self-reliance. Nature is not subordinate to us, but instead nature exists in symbiotic relationship. Likewise, nature transcends itself - for it is not one thing that creates beauty - but rather the relationship between things; nature is never static, and the more one finds it's place in it: the more beautiful it becomes. Every natural environment is whole, complete, and everything in it is doing exactly as it should. Beauty only exists if there is a viewer, it is never solitary. Likewise, reverence is always a partnership. The more that we surrender to our natural relationship with nature, the more true we become, to ourselves and the world - and, the more likely we are to endure forever. For certainly, the more separate we make ourselves from nature - the more we destroy it. Why destroy ourselves? Why kill our planet? Why be indifferent to the other creatures?

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Mamta Agarwal 06 April 2010

simple, yet enchanting, absolutely delightful, the poem is one of the few i read in school. everytime i read i am transported to himalayas, where i saw these kinds of brroks, Tennyson describes with such gay abandon. Mamta

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Lee Sadoway 23 November 2012

My father had memorized this poem in grade school backmin the 1930's. One of my lasting memories of him was him reciting this beautiful poem to me when I was a child. I read this poem aloud in honouring his memory at his funeral at sea while we committed his ashes to the deep.

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Brooke Burawski 07 August 2012

Hey! Brook - that's me!

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Anoushka Chauhan 16 April 2013

this poem is my most favourite poem, and the poet is also good 2

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dilip 08 November 2020

lovely - that should explain it all - why a lengthy comment of 20 words -

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Peter 26 October 2020

Learnt this in 1958 at spinney primary school

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Rajnish Manga 09 October 2020

I am fortunate to have read this lovely poem and was inspired to do its Hindi translation which I will post in a shot while. This is my tribute to the immortal poet Lord Tennyson.

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Linda Hepner 23 September 2020

One of the first poems I ever learned. Still makes my heart leap up!

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Richard Green, M.D. 06 September 2020

A great piece of poetry which has enchanted me since I was a 6th grader. It reminds me of nature and God: " But I go on forever."

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