Kim Barney

I was born in a bank - - my mother went there and made a deposit
Kim Barney
I was born in a bank - - my mother went there and made a deposit
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Rasmussen Fell Here

Rating: 4.3

I wonder who he was, that man
that fell in eighteen eighty-eight
from a fifty-foot precipice
in Monroe Canyon.

We know his name,
but who was he, really?
Did he leave a wife and children?
Are his descendents still around?

I first saw the sign
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Rasmussen Fell Here
Wednesday, August 1, 2018
Topic(s) of this poem: disaster
POET'S NOTES ABOUT THE POEM
I have seen this sign on the canyon wall in Monroe Canyon, Sevier County, Utah, several times. It always makes me wonder...

The photograph is of the actual sign painted on the canyon wall. They must repaint it every so often, because it looks fresher than the last time I saw it!

Notice how flat and vertical the rock wall is. It goes straight up like that for a long way!
(It looks like more than 50 feet to me.)

1 August 2018
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COMMENTS OF THE POEM
Kim Barney 01 August 2018

Utah was not even a state yet when Rasmussen fell in 1888, so this happened in Utah Territory. Utah became a state in 1896.

8 0 Reply
Smoky Hoss 13 August 2018

So many mysterious characters in the history of the old West. We will never know them, these fellow sojourner's on the path of life. This is a very good poem, I truly enjoyed it.

7 0 Reply
Bri Edwards 07 August 2018

i 'enjoyed' the 'poem'. a disaster? truly? as you've written, you know little about the event. maybe it solved problems he [0r SOMEONE ELSE] had? maybe he was rock climbing and only fell 50 feet; he could have been near the top, ascending or descending. oops! bri :) perhaps you can consult a Utah psychic.

7 0 Reply
wess vogler 04 August 2018

I get the impression we are reading the rough notes for a poem you meant to versify and rhyme later but never got around to it. stilll interesting as is

7 0 Reply
Kim Barney 05 August 2018

Not at all, Wes. I never intended for this poem to be rhymed and metered. I actually wrote it at the suggestion of my sister, who has also been to the location and seen the sign on the rock wall quite a few times. I wrote it just a couple of days after she suggested it to me. (She has written many prize-winning poems and said somebody should write a poem about this, but said she just didn't feel like doing it right now, so I decided that I would do it.

1 0 Reply
Kim Barney 05 August 2018

By the way, Wes, thank you for saying that 'Ballad of a Young Brave' was too good to be used just as a set-up for a gag. I have removed it from Poem Hunter, rewritten certain parts, changed the protagonist's name, changed the title, and made it into a serious poem. I will not be putting it back on PH, but will save it for the next contest.

1 0 Reply
Grace Jessen 02 August 2018

Good poem! He is not forgotten now. I like the format you've used. There is an element of mystery in this story that keeps us thinking about it. I choose to believe it was an accidental fall. I think the word you want is crag.

8 0 Reply
Kim Barney 02 August 2018

Thanks for the comment. You are correct about the word crag. I have corrected it in the poem. I think my brain took a small vacation. Maybe subconsciously I think all words that have the K sound should start with the letter K. Kim, kangaroo, klobber, krag, kancer, kandle...

1 0 Reply
Rajnish Manga 02 August 2018

It carries the elements of a tale of mystery. He didn't tell much about him probably because he never had the inkling of the impending tragedy that had befallen him. A nerve-racking account. Thanks.

7 0 Reply