poet Mohammad Akmal Nazir

Mohammad Akmal Nazir

*a Farmer*

Clad in shabby dress, stinks sweat,
A churlish who works day and night
In the field,
To speed up the pace of progress,
To continue the game of politics,
The destiny of kingdoms
Lies on his rough palms,
By dint of his being,
The kings are kings and
The queens are queens,
He is the father of civilization.

Poem Submitted: Friday, April 22, 2011
Poem Edited: Wednesday, July 6, 2011

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Rating Card

3,4 out of 5
33 total ratings
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Comments about *a Farmer* by Mohammad Akmal Nazir

  • Anie Vans (3/18/2012 10:26:00 PM)

    what would we do without the farmers. just a thought.

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  • Rinki Nandy (11/23/2011 10:52:00 AM)

    God bless the farmers, they are the saviors of humanity.

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  • Walterrean Salley (8/1/2011 9:14:00 AM)

    Farmers. They are the breasket of humanity. By God's grace, our fate rests with them. God bless the farmers.

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  • Raj ArumugamRaj Arumugam (6/23/2011 3:03:00 AM)

    A fitting tribute to the ordinary man, this farmer who by his work is more than ordinary...

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  • Mohammad Akmal Nazir (6/14/2011 8:49:00 AM)

     From: Buxton Shippy (WinchendonUnited States; Male; 56)
     To: Mohd. Akmal Nazir
     Date Time: 6/14/2011 8: 38: 00 AM (GMT-6: 00)
     Subject: A Farmer
    'A Farmer' is a metaphor forthe unsung heroes of society. These people are hardly ever seen yet without their contribution society would implode and collapse. It is quite a tributeto the common folks.
    I will vote it 8 out of 10.
    Buxton Shippy

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  • Narayanan Ramakrishnan (6/13/2011 3:17:00 AM)

    What more can one add to the comments, you have receivd all. What more can one add to your poem, you have penned all. Great. Narayanan.
    g

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  • Kee Thampi (6/13/2011 1:43:00 AM)

    Worthful to great farmers, they keep the world in real pace, and sacrifice their own life for us
    To speed up the pace of progress,
    To continue the game of politics,
    The destiny of kingdoms
    Lies on his rough palms,
    By dint of his being,
    The kings are kings and
    The queens are queens,
    He is the father of civilization

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  • Smoky HossSmoky Hoss (6/12/2011 10:33:00 AM)

    Wonderful observation bestowed upon the people that all people should be grateful for. Long live 'the farmers' of the world.

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  • Indira RenganathanIndira Renganathan (6/11/2011 6:04:00 AM)

    You yourself have given him the greatest award ' the father of civilization'....how else to greet, praise a farmer....well thought about theme and a good poem indeed
    congrats dear friend

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  • Curry Coon (6/10/2011 11:09:00 PM)

    A very nice poem. I very much enjoy the view given to the humble farmer.10/10

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  • Juan OlivarezJuan Olivarez (6/10/2011 8:14:00 AM)

    Ken hit the nail on the head. The farmer is the salt of the Earth, where would mighty kings and queens be without him. He is the true ruler of the Earth.

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  • Ken E Hall (6/10/2011 5:06:00 AM)

    The farmer salt of the earth we all give thanks for their ploy of the land explained in your poem a read to contemplate +++++10 regards

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  • Richard D. Remler (6/9/2011 2:25:00 PM)

    A thoughtfully penned piece. One who clears a field to plant a garden takes great pride in his/her accomplishment, even though their reward usually consists of calloused hands and an aching back. Enjoyed this write. tfs

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  • Terence George Craddock (6/7/2011 10:39:00 PM)

    Dear Mohd. Akmal Nazir,
    my comment is a sonnet
    upon the abuse of the Farmer’s Blessing.


    Sonnet On Curse Upon A Farmer’s Blessing

    A farmer can never be churlish
    even if shabby be his clothes
    even if his clothes reek sweat
    honest dirt gains forehead hands
    his toil in hot sun blesses bellies
    his labour feeds families prevents
    famine starvation disease death
    his field feeds pace of progress.

    Destiny of kingdoms empires nations
    are feed from lie in soil rough hands
    dirt being cultivation civilization toils
    politic threat war vast army marches
    stomachs well fed fight pride glory wars
    nature blesses with food feeding beasts.


    A reply to ‘A Farmer’ by Mohd. Akmal Nazir.
    Copyright © Terence George Craddock

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  • Lawrence S. Pertillar (6/7/2011 10:31:00 PM)

    This poem is simply wonderful. The imagery given of the one
    who has toiled to sweat and in dirt to uplift the lives of others,
    is a common circumstance of events many can relate to if they choose.
    Those privileged to sit on thrones of power or live lives of abundance
    and wealth, owe a great gratitude to those who initiated their lofty positions.
    Do we pay them our indebted gratifulness? Seldom. Do we acknowledge them?
    Rarely. Nice poem. Simply written. However...much profound. To rate this,
    would not giv it the justice due. Something great can not sustain a rating.
    An appreciation lasts forever.

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  • Anu LalAnu Lal (6/6/2011 9:51:00 AM)

    I too write in Poem Hunter. But I won't ask you to read my poems. That is not why I write this comment. I liked your poem. And that is the sole reason for this comment. Sometimes meanness verges kindness and we forget there should be no particular reason to be kind or polite. Be polite for it is required. And every farmer does it when it comes to his work. He becomes polite towards the earth. We eat his politeness.

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  • Mohammad Akmal Nazir (6/6/2011 6:44:00 AM)

     From: Gordon inayr (Maybole, Ayrshire United Kingdom; Male; 53)
     To: Mohd. Akmal Nazir
     Date Time: 6/1/2011 7: 16: 00 AM (GMT -6: 00)
     Subject: A farmer
    I Gave you 10 my friend for farmer, its truth is its essence

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  • Ramesh T ARamesh T A (6/4/2011 3:30:00 AM)

    In the smile of farmers only all can really see God!

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  • Stan Petrovich (6/4/2011 3:26:00 AM)

    About 'A farmer': nothing can be more true than that: it is the common man who bloats the pockets of the ruling class. For many years I worked for 'slave wages' and the corporate entities made millions from the toil of workers like me. In the US this is taken for granted, and I suspect elsewhere too. Since the dawn of time the so-called upper class has made millions a killing duping the common man, and will continue to do so as long as they (the corporate bosses) can avoid revolution. My feeling is that there will be an all-out revolution in this country if the corporations keep blatantly ripping off the poor. Probably not in my lifetime, but it will happen as surely as the French Revolution, and for the identical reasons. Therefore, for its insight, I rate 'A farmer' a 10.

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  • lost soul (5/1/2011 2:44:00 PM)

    well crafted with
    striking juxtaposiiton:

    'by dint of his being, 'the kings are kings
    and the queens are queens'
    but the 'CHURLISH who works day and night
    clad in shabby dress, stinks sweat
    is the father of civilization'.

    without him, there would be no civilization

    10+

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