Pete Crowther

Pete Crowther Biography

Web pages www.wilgilsland.co.uk
Web pages www.lulu.com/content/214133#
Web pages www.flickr.com/photos/petecrowther/
Web pages http: //moonhare77.deviantart.com

Born in Hull in East Yorkshire into a seafaring family, he spent some time in the Royal Navy after completing his education, before a career as chief cataloguer at the universities of Birmingham, and Hull where he served under the poet and librarian, Philip Larkin. Now retired he lives with his wife in a small cottage sandwiched between the North Sea and the broad River Humber. He first started writing poetry as a hobby just three years ago. His other interests are natural history, Egyptology, and local history. He is a keen cyclist and motorcyclist.
Early this year (2006) , he had a selection of his poems published as a book, entitled “Calling the Moon”, by the on-line publishers-on-demand, Lulu.com (http: //www.lulu.com/214133#) . This book features poems written by the author between late 2003 and early 2006. There are many sea-related poems in the collection reflecting the author’s close association with and love for the sea. Other themes stem from his interest and fascination with Egyptology while readers may be surprised by the number of ‘rat’ poems; he and his wife have kept pet rats for several years and found them to be lovable and rewarding pets. The author likes to experiment with different kinds and styles of poems so that here will be found humorous poems, serious poems, long poems, short poems, narrative poems, found poems, collage poems, and both rhymed and unrhymed poems. Some are written in blank verse while others are written in a variety of formal styles and metres. He admits to having been influenced by the poet, Robin Skelton’s rich source book of descriptions and examples of poetic forms from all over the world, both ancient and modern, 'The Shapes of Our Singing'(2002) . A further book of poems, 'Dancing in the Wind' was published in 2007.

The Best Poem Of Pete Crowther

A Biker's Funeral

(In memory of Stephen (Reggie) Pearce
of Kilnsea,1980–2005)

The wind blows cold through the churchyard trees
and sadly tolls the passing bell
as mourners shuffle up the leaf-strewn
narrow path between the leaning stones.

He was just twenty-five, so young,
so full of life, and love of life
and laughter — killed outright one night
in a head-on crash on his motorbike.

From far and wide we’ve gathered here
to pay respect to our young friend.
I’ve never seen the church so full,
oh death, how can you be so cruel?

Who will forget this funeral?
Four hundred strong in the nave we stood,
family and friends both young and old
and a phalanx of bikers in leathers and boots.

Between the holy platitudes
and hymns they played his favourite songs;
one had to smile to hear within
that ancient august church of stone

come belting out the vibrant tones
of modern rock and heavy metal.
Who can forget the coffin passing
in procession like a royal barque,

the biker’s helmet on its lid
resplendent in heraldic tones
— rich gules, azure, argent, or,
a shining light of knightly splendour?

Who will forget that send-off from
his fellow bikers when three score
or more bright gleaming motorcycles
with a thunderous roar led off the hearse?

Pete Crowther Comments

Michael Shepherd 12 February 2005

Eat your heart out, Hallmark Cards! Hearty congratulations, Peter.

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Michael Tonkin 21 February 2005

I am slowly making my way through your poems, and they all have something to say to me. I like 'A Fly In Amber' especially, I like the way it has existed from whenever and has seen all these wonderful moments. Anyone who knows what Eocene means deserves a medal, I had to look it up.

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Philippa Lane 04 August 2005

I do think you are an especially gifted poet. You capture precious moments in your life; much as you capture your precious moths - with design, passion and dedication to the job at hand. You make something ordinary, extraordinarily beautiful. Your titles are wonderful, and throughout each poem runs a vein of simplicity which, it seems to me, comes from a deep reverence for life.

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Kareem Abdulrahim 16 October 2006

i'm not sure how i feel about your bons mots, but the rest of your poetry is awesome. It is unexplainable how great the poems are.

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Scarlett Treat 21 May 2006

Pete, you are, without a doubt, one of the best pastoral poets I have ever had the pleasure of reading. Your work takes me out of myself into another world, one filled with joy of 'all things wise and wonderful, all things great and small.' Thank you for being kind enough to share your writing with me, and your insight into life as well. You are awsome, Pete.

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Lori Boulard 16 January 2006

Peter, I just want to let you know that whenever I feel like traveling, I end up among your poems. Each one is a little trip somewhere interesting, often pastoral, and always worth visiting. Thank you for them!

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Amanda Lukas 12 December 2005

Always refreshing to read your work, Peter. You have a wonderfully descriptive nature! Keep up the great work. Looking forward to reading new poems!

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Louise Marie Delsanto 11 November 2005

Thank you so much for reading me..Your poetry is quite beautiful..and you do have a talent for creative expression yourself...a pleasure reading you... louise

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